Home Hypertension Neurosurgeon, patient celebrate recovery after 10th, and final, brain surgery

Neurosurgeon, patient celebrate recovery after 10th, and final, brain surgery

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On Friday, Lauren Warden and her mother drove from Pulaski, Virginia, to Novant Health Brain & Spine Surgery in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to see the person who changed her life: Dr. Rashid Janjua.Sitting together at a waiting room table it’s clear the pair have a bond; What is hidden, however, is Warden’s resiliency. She is the mother of three sons, a wife and a woman who ached for her life back.”If my kid were here today they would tell you, ‘mom is back’ and if you asked my husband if his wife is back he’d say ‘yes,'” Warden said.Warden said the headaches, forgetfulness and confusion started sometime in 2015, but it wasn’t until 2017 she learned she had idiopathic intracranial hypertension.”They would want me to play and I just want to play with them. I would play with them daily but then we could only go outside for like five minutes at a time and then we’d have to go back in and I would have to rest,” she said.The condition causes pressure to build in the brain, causing myriad side effects including painful headaches.”The official name for the disease is idiopathic intracranial hypertension. These patients have pressure build up inside of their head, but they don’t have a tumor, so that’s why it’s a called a pseudotumor.” Warden tried medication and numerous procedures, seeking treatment in both Virgina and North Carolina. After the efforts were unsuccessful, Janjua developed a treatment plan that would include inserting tissue expanders into Warden’s head to stretch the skin over the skull before undergoing an operation that would expand the size of her skull to alleviate the painful pressure. “It is very, very stressful because every operation — a minute error can lead to a devastating result,” he said. “The operation is essentially making the skull bigger.”Janjua used the example of a wrapped gift box. He said not only does the box (the skull) need to be bigger, but there must be more paper (the skin) to cover it.”First we have to make the skin bigger and then go in and make the box bigger so you can actually close everything back up again,” he said.Janjua said to embark on an aggressive surgery, it is imperative there is a strong trust between provider and patient. For him, he said, it is feeling his faith and seeing his patient for all that they are that guides him. “I love Lauren. And for what she has accomplished, I’m really proud of her,” he said.Warden said she now enjoys fishing and swimming with her children, free of headaches, and is able to make plans with her family without worry of pain or disappointment.”I have so many scars on my head and I love every single one of them. It’s just me now,” she said. “Dr. Janjua made me look like a mom and not a patient. That’s how my kids see me: I’m their mom, not a patient. They don’t even care.”The pair share a deep bond, but joked Friday, they hoped they would not see each other again.

On Friday, Lauren Warden and her mother drove from Pulaski, Virginia, to Novant Health Brain & Spine Surgery in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to see the person who changed her life: Dr. Rashid Janjua.

Sitting together at a waiting room table it’s clear the pair have a bond; What is hidden, however, is Warden’s resiliency. She is the mother of three sons, a wife and a woman who ached for her life back.

“If my kid were here today they would tell you, ‘mom is back’ and if you asked my husband if his wife is back he’d say ‘yes,'” Warden said.

Warden said the headaches, forgetfulness and confusion started sometime in 2015, but it wasn’t until 2017 she learned she had idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

“They would want me to play and I just want to play with them. I would play with them daily but then we could only go outside for like five minutes at a time and then we’d have to go back in and I would have to rest,” she said.

The condition causes pressure to build in the brain, causing myriad side effects including painful headaches.

“The official name for the disease is idiopathic intracranial hypertension. These patients have pressure build up inside of their head, but they don’t have a tumor, so that’s why it’s a called a pseudotumor.”

Warden tried medication and numerous procedures, seeking treatment in both Virgina and North Carolina.

After the efforts were unsuccessful, Janjua developed a treatment plan that would include inserting tissue expanders into Warden’s head to stretch the skin over the skull before undergoing an operation that would expand the size of her skull to alleviate the painful pressure.

“It is very, very stressful because every operation — a minute error can lead to a devastating result,” he said. “The operation is essentially making the skull bigger.”

Janjua used the example of a wrapped gift box. He said not only does the box (the skull) need to be bigger, but there must be more paper (the skin) to cover it.

“First we have to make the skin bigger and then go in and make the box bigger so you can actually close everything back up again,” he said.

Janjua said to embark on an aggressive surgery, it is imperative there is a strong trust between provider and patient. For him, he said, it is feeling his faith and seeing his patient for all that they are that guides him.

“I love Lauren. And for what she has accomplished, I’m really proud of her,” he said.

Warden said she now enjoys fishing and swimming with her children, free of headaches, and is able to make plans with her family without worry of pain or disappointment.

“I have so many scars on my head and I love every single one of them. It’s just me now,” she said. “Dr. Janjua made me look like a mom and not a patient. That’s how my kids see me: I’m their mom, not a patient. They don’t even care.”

The pair share a deep bond, but joked Friday, they hoped they would not see each other again.

https://www.wxii12.com/article/neurosurgeon-patient-celebrate-recovery-after-10th-and-final-brain-surgery/33837023

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