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Mental health help is available in pandemic crisis

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Omaha metro doctors, therapists and hospital emergency rooms are seeing a huge increase in the number of people seeking help for mental health issues, especially in recent weeks, in the wake of the death of Dr. Joe Stothert, Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert’s husband. Dr. Stothert died at his home on March 5, after a year of declining mental health and despite pleas from his family to talk to someone about his anxiety and depression in dealing with the pandemic, and concerns about his future as a surgeon.“Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it,” said Stothert in a recent interview about the loss of her husband. She said that she herself went to her doctor recently and counseling was suggested to work through her loss. Newswatch 7 has learned many therapy offices and counseling services have few openings this week, as people reach out for support for mental health issues. Nebraska Medicine reports that one in every eight patients in the emergency room is there for psychiatric reasons.Therapist Suzanne Piotrowski, with Sage Counseling in West Omaha, said they’ve added providers and expanded in recent months to meet the growing needs of people dealing with COVID-19-related depression and anxiety. Therapists there say they are seeing three times the number of clients they did, prior to the start of the pandemic. “We’re dealing with the mental health effects of COVID and people are getting into that negative mind space because of COVID,” said Piotrowski. They worry about whether life will return to normal and whether another incident like this could derail life. In addition, she said some patients who’ve physically recovered from the virus are having lasting issues with depression and anxiety. Piotrowski said the issues are real and therapists aren’t certain whether there’s a physical reason for the change or whether it’s psychological. Piotrowski said the office keeps some appointments open each week for emergencies, but the average wait time to get in to see a therapist is one week.“It can take a few days to get insurance information and get everything in place,” she said. Piotrowski advises people to be patient. She said people will often call the office after hours or send an email in the middle of the night when no one is working, and they become frustrated.“It’s important to let people know that therapists operate during normal business hours and please be patient,” she said. https://sagecounselingomaha.com/Psychiatrists say you can also start with your family doctor. Make an appointment and explain what you are feeling. Many family physicians are comfortable prescribing medication for anxiety and depression. It’s important to note that it can take weeks and months to find the right medication and dosage. Nebraska Medicine recently opened a 24-hour Psychiatric Emergency Services Unit in Omaha to serve the growing need for emergency mental health care.The unit features a calm and compassionate environment away from the Emergency Department and it’s open every day of the week. The Adult Psychiatric Emergency Services Unit is located at Clarkson Tower, 4350 Dewey Ave. To make an appointment, call 800-922-0000 or for more information go to:https://www.nebraskamed.com/nebraska-medical-center/clarkson-tower/adult-pes

Omaha metro doctors, therapists and hospital emergency rooms are seeing a huge increase in the number of people seeking help for mental health issues, especially in recent weeks, in the wake of the death of Dr. Joe Stothert, Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert’s husband.

Dr. Stothert died at his home on March 5, after a year of declining mental health and despite pleas from his family to talk to someone about his anxiety and depression in dealing with the pandemic, and concerns about his future as a surgeon.

“Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it,” said Stothert in a recent interview about the loss of her husband. She said that she herself went to her doctor recently and counseling was suggested to work through her loss.

Newswatch 7 has learned many therapy offices and counseling services have few openings this week, as people reach out for support for mental health issues.

Nebraska Medicine reports that one in every eight patients in the emergency room is there for psychiatric reasons.

Therapist Suzanne Piotrowski, with Sage Counseling in West Omaha, said they’ve added providers and expanded in recent months to meet the growing needs of people dealing with COVID-19-related depression and anxiety. Therapists there say they are seeing three times the number of clients they did, prior to the start of the pandemic.

“We’re dealing with the mental health effects of COVID and people are getting into that negative mind space because of COVID,” said Piotrowski. They worry about whether life will return to normal and whether another incident like this could derail life.

In addition, she said some patients who’ve physically recovered from the virus are having lasting issues with depression and anxiety. Piotrowski said the issues are real and therapists aren’t certain whether there’s a physical reason for the change or whether it’s psychological.

Piotrowski said the office keeps some appointments open each week for emergencies, but the average wait time to get in to see a therapist is one week.

“It can take a few days to get insurance information and get everything in place,” she said. Piotrowski advises people to be patient. She said people will often call the office after hours or send an email in the middle of the night when no one is working, and they become frustrated.

“It’s important to let people know that therapists operate during normal business hours and please be patient,” she said.

https://sagecounselingomaha.com/

Psychiatrists say you can also start with your family doctor. Make an appointment and explain what you are feeling. Many family physicians are comfortable prescribing medication for anxiety and depression. It’s important to note that it can take weeks and months to find the right medication and dosage.

Nebraska Medicine recently opened a 24-hour Psychiatric Emergency Services Unit in Omaha to serve the growing need for emergency mental health care.

The unit features a calm and compassionate environment away from the Emergency Department and it’s open every day of the week. The Adult Psychiatric Emergency Services Unit is located at Clarkson Tower, 4350 Dewey Ave. To make an appointment, call 800-922-0000 or for more information go to:

https://www.nebraskamed.com/nebraska-medical-center/clarkson-tower/adult-pes

https://www.ketv.com/article/depression-and-anxiety-are-real-mental-health-help-is-available-in-pandemic-crisis/35983321

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