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Investigating Racial Differences among Men in COVID-19 Diagnosis, and Related Psychosocial and Behavioral Factors: Data from the Michigan Men’s Health Event

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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Mar 22;18(6):3284. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18063284.

ABSTRACT

Extant research is growing in its ability to explain sex differences in novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis and mortality. Moving beyond comparisons based on biological sex is now warranted to capture a more nuanced picture of disparities in COVID-19 diagnosis and mortality specifically among men who are more likely to die of the illness. The objective of this study was to investigate racial disparities in COVID-19-related psychosocial, behavior and health variables among men. The present study utilizes a sample of 824 men who participated in a free health event held in a Midwestern state. Chi-square analysis showed that African American men were more likely to report an adverse impact of COVID-19 based on several factors including experiencing more COVID-19-related medical issues (χ2 = 4.60 p = 0.03); higher COVID-19 diagnosis (χ2 = 4.60 p = 0.02); trouble paying for food (χ2 = 8.47, p = 0.00), rent (χ2 = 12.26, p = 0.00), medication (χ2 = 7.10 p = 0.01) and utility bills (χ2 = 19.68, p = 0.00); higher fear of contracting COVID-19 (χ2 = 31.19, p = 0.00); and higher rates of death of close friends and family due to COVID (χ2 = 48.85, p = 0.00). Non-Hispanic white men reported more increased stress levels due to COVID-19 compared to African American men (χ2 = 10.21, p = 0.01). Regression analysis showed that race was a significant predictor of self-reported COVID-19 diagnosis (OR = 2.56, p < 0.05) after controlling for demographic characteristics. The results showed that compared to non-Hispanic White men, African American men were more likely to report an adverse impact of COVID-19 based on several factors including experiencing more COVID-19-related medical issues; higher COVID-19 diagnosis; trouble paying for food, rent, medication and utility bills; higher fear of contracting COVID-19; and higher rates of death of close friends and family due to COVID. Interestingly, non-Hispanic white men reported more increased stress levels due to COVID-19 compared to African American men.

PMID:33810055 | DOI:10.3390/ijerph18063284

https://www.docwirenews.com/abstracts/journal-abstracts/investigating-racial-differences-among-men-in-covid-19-diagnosis-and-related-psychosocial-and-behavioral-factors-data-from-the-michigan-mens-health-event-8/

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